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Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey (ECLS) and National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS88)

Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey (ECLS)The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS) Program provides national data on children's status at birth and at various points thereafter; children's transitions to nonparental care, early education programs, and school; and children's experiences and growth through the fifth grade. ECLS also provides data to test hypotheses about the effects of a wide range of family, school, community and individual variables on children's development, early learning and early performance in school. Longitudinal Survey and Earlier Longitudinal Surveys (ECLS.)

National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS88) A nationally representative sample of eighth-graders were first surveyed in the spring of 1988. A sample of these respondents were then resurveyed through four follow-ups in 1990, 1992, 1994, and 2000. On the questionnaire, students reported on a range of topics including: school, work, and home experiences; educational resources and support; the role in education of their parents and peers; neighborhood characteristics; educational and occupational aspirations; and other student perceptions. Additional topics included self-reports on smoking, alcohol and drug use and extracurricular activities. For the three in-school waves of data collection (when most were eighth-graders, sophomores, or seniors), achievement tests in reading, social studies, mathematics and science were administered in addition to the student questionnaire.National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88)

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AIR staff work extensively with data sets from National Center from Education Statistics (NCES) and other government agencies. Through this site, we can assist other researchers who are using AM to analyze these data sets. In our FAQs, we try to accumulate answers to questions that many data users will find helpful. We make our best efforts to research your questions and answer accurately. It remains your responsibility to verify this information. AIR assumes no liability for information provided through this service. We also note that these answers come from AIR, not NCES. We try to maintain current links from our pages to the appropriate official NCES program area web pages.